Thursday, April 24, 2014

Authors Build Brand Using Literary Contributions

Build brand, market books and create free author publicity showing off your literary contributions on Facebook and other social media. 



If you use Facebook and other social media, and I am sure you must if you are an author, turn the platforms into more than just a list of friends sharing what they had for dinner or when they last washed the dog. 



Organizing Storage for Home Offices using portable boxes and bins

Organize and Re-organize

Convert your friends, fans, followers, contacts and connections into your your book-buying audience. 


Social media are resources many writers and published authors neglect. 


Take all those literary, journal and magazine contributions you have written over the years that you are gathering dust in storage boxes or wire file bins in closets and make something exciting happen in your career. Yes, I mean take what you regarded as old junk. Build brand and create free book promotion with writing you thought was well past its prime. Select one of the published stories and write a press release about the story and the book in which it appeared. WOW! How novel is that? No so much. The purpose of the news release can be multipurpose
  • Promote yourself as an author
  • Advertise a collection in which you have contributed
  • Sell the collection using your Amazon account
  • Market an upcoming release

Don't have an Amazon account? Get one to increase your revenue. Selling on Amazon: How You Can Make A Full-Time Income Selling On Amazon is a great place to start.

After you have written your press release, post the link to the press release on your Facebook page or another page you manage. If you don't have a fan page for your book or career, then create a fan pageThis gets people responding to you as a writer and primes them to buy books in which you have contributed--the ones you are promoting through your Amazon account. 


Promote yourself, books in which you have contributed and a new title you are about to complete.  



Sunny Nash Signing
Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's
 As a published author, you hold the key to a very simple formula to building brand for your professional career and to initiating sales revenue. Because the formula is multifaceted, the benefits are not dependent on one activity. Try to get as much result as you can, but promotion of yourself and your writing is the goal, but you can't get there by yourself. Everyone needs a hand up. That's what a great editor can do for you, give you a hand up. And you have to remember to pass that hand up along to someone else trying to get where you are.

Many years ago the late David Bowen publisher and editor of Corona Press in San Antonio, Texas, read some articles I wrote for my newspaper column and contacted me for a meeting. David was one of the fiercest and, at the same time, gentlest editors I've ever had. He invited me for a weekend to San Antonio, where I had lived years before. He wanted to discuss how to turn my columns into a longer work of fiction. And he asked me to bring some long fiction with me, if I had any, so that he could take a look for possible publication. The longest fiction I had written were a couple of related short stories that he thought, after reading them, I might turn into a serial or novella. 
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Sometimes, we all need a little help when we are writing a project. Maybe you have writer's block; maybe you are distracted; maybe the dishes need washing or the baby needs changing. Well, there are services to help with all of the above. But mostly writers need editorial help when they get stuck. 
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Yesterdays - Sunny Nash
Yesterdays - Sunny Nash
One of the stories, "The Ladies' Room," had been published in Common Bonds: Stories by and About Modern Texas Women, edited by the late Suzanne Comer. This publication was only my second published short story. Suzanne contacted me after reading my first newspaper column, edited by Diane Bowen. I equally surprised when Diane called me for a meeting about the history column she was starting at the newspaper. "It's an experiment," she said. "I think people will like reading about the history of the region. I'm calling it 'Yesterdays.'" Well the experiment turned into five years, thousands of letters, national syndication and my book deal for Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's, based on the column, which ran until Diane left the paper to accept a better job.

Common Bonds: Stories  By and About Modern  Texas Women;  Edited with a Preface  By Suzanne Comer  (Southwest Life  and Letters)
Common Bonds: Stories
 By and About Modern
 Texas Women;
Edited with a Preface
 By Suzanne Comer
(Southwest Life
and Letters)
At first, I couldn't understand why Suzanne wanted to include me. I had only written one short story. As unlikely as this may sound, my first short story, a Christmas piece, was published by The Farmer-Stockman, an agricultural journal for ranchers and feed growers, not a publication known for its literary contributions. That's another story how I got the job writing for The Farmer-Stockman; another time I promise. 

Suzanne guided my story, "The Ladies' Room," and seemed to know where I was trying to go with it. "This part of a longer piece?" She asked. "Not that I am aware of," I said. "Why do you ask." "It just reads like there's a lot of back story that I want to know," she said. Suzanne was right. There was a lot of back story that she did not live to read. In fact, she died the day after the book she edited, Common Bonds: Stories by and About Modern Texas Women , was released, but she did get to see a copy. I miss her.


Let's Hear It:
Stories by Texas
Women Writers
(Tarleton State
University Southwestern
 Studies in the Humanities,
No. 16)
Bigmama Didn’t Shop
At Woolworth’s
After my book, Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's, was released, I had gained literary capital, having been asked by First Lady, Laura Bush to read from my book at her Inaugural Texas Book Festival, held at the Texas Capitol. A few years later, Sylvia Ann Grider and Lou Halsell Rodenberger contacted me about including "The Ladies' Room" in a book they were editing, Let's Hear It: Stories by Texas Women Writers, placed in historical and literary context. Katherine Ann Porter, Joyce Gibson Roach, Carolyn Osborn, me and others weave a story of our own, the story of women's writing in the Lone Star State.

Excerpt "The Ladies Room" from Common Bonds: Stories by and About Modern Texas Women edited by Suzanne Comer 
(Little girl describing the restroom in her home): 

Slivers of early morning summer sun crept through cracks in the bathroom ceiling. Flowers of light bloomed on the unpainted splintering walls and the back of the door where Dorsey's faded douche bag hung limply. 
      Beside the door a washbowl that once was white rested unevenly against the wall. A small dish holding oddly shaped pieces of soap rested over a whole where the washbowl's waterspout used to be. Just above the washbowl, a row of nails, in perfect symmetry, held five frayed washrags of various colors. Above them, hung a cracked mirror.

David liked the flow of characters and events in "The Ladies' Room," but doubted my ability to fill the in-between to create a longer project. And quite honestly, so did I, having little experience with any writing other than journalism. Frankly, David didn't know what to do with me. He said he thought I had talent, but now what? 

Sunny Nash
Jeff Zwolinski
So, he spent the weekend escorting me around my old haunts in San Antonio like Earl Abels' Restaurant at Broadway and Hildebrand, a place we musicians frequented after hours for breakfast and socializing after our gigs ended at 1 a.m. and 2 a.m on Saturday's when I was singing at Club Satin Doll, where Chuck Angelini greeted elite guests nightly, or Club Chandelier on Nacogdoches Road or Eastwood Country Club, a last-surving cornerstone of the old Chitlin' Circuit. Although Club Chandelier was still operating at the time, it had been many years and several generations of musicians ago since many of those doors had darkened permanently and been replaced by prerecorded disco and then house music. 

David took me to a new jazz club where he knew a fresh set of players. He asked me if I felt like belting out a number of two. "Sure, why not?" He asked the band if I could sit in and sing with them. "You've still got it," he said after I placed my signature at the end of "Misty" a jazz standard written by pianist, Erroll Garner, in 1954, and became Johnny Mathis' signature song after he recorded it on his 1959 album, Heavenly, that went to No.12 on the U.S. Pop Singles. As it turned out, we knew a lot of the same people; some sitting in the audience. We had a great time. 

New Growth 2 Edited by Mark Busby
New Growth/2: 
Contemporary 
Short Stories 
by Texas Writers

I didn't see him after that. From a mutual friend, I heard he was ill. I tried calling him and got no answer. Not long afterwards, I was presenting a lecture and photo exhibition at St. Johns College in Santa Fe, and a mutual friend told me David had died. However, David had sent my story, "Too High For Birds," along to his friend and author, Mark Busby, who liked "Too High For Birds" and included it in his collection, New Growth 2: Contemporary Short Stories by Texas Writers, which David's publishing company, Corona Press, had scheduled to publish.

Excerpt "Too High For Birds" from New Growth 2Contemporary Short Stories by Texas Writers edited by Mark Busby 
(Little girl in conversation with grandmother): 
"Never get so hungry I eat something that much like me."
    Grammy turned around and looked at me. "You do kind of remind me of a coon sometimes."
     "I don't look like a coon, Grammy! Coon is an ugly little thing with hair sticking up every which way. He has black rings around his little marble eyes. He has a sharp nose and no lips. The only thing pretty about a coon is his tail. And I don't have one."
      "Like said, you do look like you may be part  of that coon family." 

"Too High For Birds" is a particularly significant achievement to me because the story is the name of my own collection of related short stories. I have finally filled in the in-between that David suggested I do all those years ago and that Suzanne said was part of a back story she wanted to read. I am so glad to finally fulfill my destiny with the work those two editors were confident I could handle. I will never forget how wonderful it felt to have my second literary contribution in a book, almost as gratifying as my first literary contribution, "The Ladies' Room," in Common Bonds and, in both cases, to be among some of the most important fiction writers Texas has produced. 

Mark Busby, Editor, New Growth 2
Mark Busby, Editor, New Growth 2
Later, Mark Busby, who shares my enthusiasm for literature of the American West, invited me to submit a story for the Southwestern American Literature journal, for which he serves as editor. Of course, I did and my short story "Amen" also became some of the meat in the sandwich to which Suzanne Comer and David Bowen alluded. It seemed that each time I produced another short story, the characters stayed with me.

Add caption

Excerpt "Amen" from Southwestern American Literature edited by Mark Busby and The African American West: A Century of Short Stories edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Laurie Champion
(Little girl's revival experience):



"You better pull out some more money," Dorsey said to the healing preacher. "Or else a gun to shoot me with." Melroy handed Dorsey more money. She stared at the bills and snapped her fingers for more. Melroy reluctantly handed her more bills, which she stuffed in her bosom. 

    "What a fellowship," the congregation sand. "What a joy divine," Melroy joined in as he entered the side door of the revival shack. In a hurry, Dorsey almost ran over me. "Why you fool the people, Dorsey?" I asked, pulling up my panties after my pee in the dirt on the side of the shack. 

    "I didn't fool them,” she said. “They know I don't need healing. They know Melroy can't do it if I do need healing." 
    "Then what is everybody praying and hollering about?" I watched Dorsey's stubby hair being raised by a strong breeze. "That wasn't praying," she said. 

    "Then why is everybody saying Amen!" 


    "Every time a body says Amen don't mean a body's praying, Lacy." 

    "No, it means they are poking fun at God!" I yelled.


    "You laughed harder than anybody in there!" 

    "But I wasn't poking fun at God. I was poking fun at yawl." 

    "That's because it's a show, Lacy! A big joke!" Dorsey walked away.

One publication can lead to another and another and so on and so on.


The African American  West: A Century of Short Stories
The African American
 West: A Century
of Short Stories
Ralph Ellison
The African American West
The publication of "Amen" in Southwestern American Literature led to "Amen" being published in a number of other prestigious collections like The African American West: A Century of Short Stories. In this book, I am in the company of Ralph Ellison, Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DeBois, Zora Neal Hurston, Chester Himes, Rita Dove, fellow Texan J. California Cooper and many other important American writers. You just never know where publication will lead.

Since the time of those short story publications, I have been asked to contribute  to a number of literary publications and have made strong friendships in the industry like Mark Busby. New Growth 2 is still helping me to promote myself and sell my book, Bigmama Didn't Shop at Woolworth's, based on my nationally syndicated newspaper column about life with my part Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement.


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Sunny Nash




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Join Sunny Nash on Huffington Post
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Each time you post on Facebook or your other social media gives you an opportunity to market your brand and draw attention to books and products you sell online. 


Not direct sales but indirect sales. 


Indirect is better because this method attracts what they call "organic online shoppers." Search engines like organic anything better than the targeted audience. 

However, search engines do pick up your content from Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social media if your initial content is strong. Content is the key in all writing on the Internet.

  1. As an content writer, remember to use headlines, titles and content headings to attract your audience to products you sell online. It does not matter what your online product may be.








Bigmama Didn’t Shop  At Woolworth’s  Sunny Nash
Bigmama Didn’t Shop 
At Woolworth’s 
Sunny Nash

Hard Cover

Amazon Kindle
Sunny Nash author of bigmama didn't shop at woolworth's
Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash is an author, producer, photographer and leading writer on U.S. race relations. She writes books, blogs, articles and reviews, and produces media and images on U.S. history and contemporary American topics, ranging from Jim Crow laws to social media networking. Sunny Nash is the author of Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's (Texas A&M University Press), about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement. 

Nash’s book is recognized by the Association of American University Presses as essential for understanding U.S. race relations; listed in the Bibliographic Guide to Black Studies by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York; and recommended for Native American collections by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida. Nash uses her book to write articles and blogs on race relations in America through topics relating to her life--from music, film, early radio and television, entertainment, social media, Internet technology, publishing, journalism, sports, education, employment, the military, fashion, performing arts, literature, women's issues, adolescence and childhood, equal rights, social and political movements--past and present—to today's post-racism.


© 2014 Sunny Nash
All Rights Reserved Worldwide.
www.sunnynash.com

~Thank You~


Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Content Titles Increase Search Engine Rank

YouTube titles are similar to FaceBook status updates and content titles.

If you update on FaceBook, produce on YouTube and write a blog, content titles, the first keywords seen, are your most important job.

newspaper content
Content Starts with a Title
Good writing is good writing, no matter where it appears--in newspapers, content online or YouTube. Even social media users should pay more attention to their writing, especially if they are using social media for advertising.



Good writing applies to writing online or print content. Remember the newspaper? That medium produced great headlines. There were headline editors assigned specifically to writing and editing headlines. Great headlines sold newspapers, at least until the Internet took all of that away. Oh, the good old days.

Find the right keyword checker for you here. Start your Custom Search
Google




Oh, the good old days.

FaceBook status and Content titles increase search engine rank for YouTube, websites and blogs


Great newspaper headlines and book titles did years ago what FaceBook status updates, YouTube slogans and content titles do today. 

Without a great title, a book hasn't a chance of getting support or optimal shelf space in a bookstore, until the Internet helped to shut down nearly every brick-and-mortar bookstore in the nation. 


Writing content titles to increase online shopping requires a different approach than constructing content titles for print.



Content for print is written for human readers, specifically editors, and does not have to face the scrutiny of search engine or require search engine optimization. Online writing, on the other hand, must be written for human readers, and sometimes human editors, as well as the scrutiny of search engines, in order to be ranked high enough to be located by those human readers. Even post updates can be optimized with tiny headlines or content titles and content subtitles or subheads that will attract the attention of an online viewer, follower, Internet customer or search engine. 


When you search your browser, notice the text that appears in the list—content titles and content subtitles.


Find the right keyword checker for you here. Start your Custom Search
Google




Sunny Nash



Join Sunny Nash on Facebook
Join Sunny Nash on Facebook

Follow Sunny Nash @ Twitter
Follow Sunny Nash on Twitter

Join Sunny Nash on Huffington Post
Join Sunny Nash on Huffington Post

Each time you post on FaceBook or your other social media gives you an opportunity to market your brand and draw attention to your books products you sell online. 

Not direct sales but indirect sales. 


Indirect is better because this method attracts what they call "organic online shoppers." Search engines like organic anything better than the targeted audience. 

However, search engines do pick up your content from Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn and other social media if your initial content is strong. Content is the key in all writing on the Internet.

  1. As an content writer, remember to use headlines, titles and content headings to attract your audience to products you sell online. It does not matter what your online product may be.







Bigmama Didn’t Shop  At Woolworth’s  Sunny Nash
Bigmama Didn’t Shop 
At Woolworth’s 
Sunny Nash

Hard Cover

Amazon Kindle
Sunny Nash author of bigmama didn't shop at woolworth's
Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash is an author, producer, photographer and leading writer on U.S. race relations. She writes books, blogs, articles and reviews, and produces media and images on U.S. history and contemporary American topics, ranging from Jim Crow laws to social media networking. Sunny Nash is the author of Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's (Texas A&M University Press), about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement. 

Nash’s book is recognized by the Association of American University Presses as essential for understanding U.S. race relations; listed in the Bibliographic Guide to Black Studies by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York; and recommended for Native American collections by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida. Nash uses her book to write articles and blogs on race relations in America through topics relating to her life--from music, film, early radio and television, entertainment, social media, Internet technology, publishing, journalism, sports, education, employment, the military, fashion, performing arts, literature, women's issues, adolescence and childhood, equal rights, social and political movements--past and present—to today's post-racism.





Free Google Keyword Tool
Google Keyword Tool & Trends


Choose keywords to describe your content. Then check your keywords with Google Keyword Checker.


Keywords change as online customers change what he or she is looking for on the Internet. With these changes, the online customer changes the nature of their searches. As you have probably noticed, the Internet is not a static environment.


Edit after checking keyword popularity. I find that using a plural or singular form can make a difference in keyword response. There are good keywords and there are great keywords. For headline search engine optimization, consult a free online keyword optimizing service and check the rating of the words before you make your choice of keywords. Read content subtitles aloud to hear how they sound to you. Based on keyword optimization, search engines may like the sound of your the subtitle, but human ears may have another opinion. 


Make titles clear, simple and short.


  • Read your title aloud. 
  • How does it sound to you? 

Be sure to use keywords from you headlines and subheads in your post updates, articles and press releases. Keywords should appear early in your content so search engines can locate them with ease. Usually, search engines categorize online content based on content titles or headlines. So, it is important to start with optimized headlines and then move on to your subheads.


Internet content requires search engine optimization (SEO) in order to improve ranking.



That is the rest of the story. In addition to using keywords in your article that represent your theme, you want to use words that correspond to those that users key into browsers looking for information similar your articles and press releases may contain. Once you have decided what words are the best matches in both cases, use those words to write the rest of your content. Be careful not to repeat keywords too many times in the content or search engines will penalize you.


When choosing keywords to optimize your headline and avoid very general categories. Some experts suggest that keyword phrases are more effective than single keywords. The lesson here is to use specific keyword phrases. Take a word like people--way too general. Answer the following question about your keyword, people. 

  • Who are these people? 
  • Are the people professionals? 
  • What is their profession? 
  • Are they writers, hairstylists, doctors…? 

Answering these questions will help you identify your specific people or target audience. In your headline and throughout your article, call the audience by name, recognizing what they are—web designers and not simply people. Call landscapers, landscapers. Get the idea?

Your search engine ranking will be higher if you optimize content subtitles, titles and content with specific keywords. When you have a choice of words that mean essentially the same thing, choose the word that has the highest ranking for headlines and subheads, where your space is limited to a finite number of characters. 


Efficiency is the rule. 


Bigmama Didn’t Shop  At Woolworth’s  Sunny Nash
Bigmama Didn’t Shop 
At Woolworth’s 
Sunny Nash

Hard Cover

Amazon Kindle
Sunny Nash author of bigmama didn't shop at woolworth's
Sunny Nash

Sunny Nash is an author, producer, photographer and leading writer on U.S. race relations. She writes books, blogs, articles and reviews, and produces media and images on U.S. history and contemporary American topics, ranging from Jim Crow laws to social media networking. Sunny Nash is the author of Bigmama Didn't Shop At Woolworth's (Texas A&M University Press), about life with her part-Comanche grandmother during the Civil Rights Movement. 

Nash’s book is recognized by the Association of American University Presses as essential for understanding U.S. race relations; listed in the Bibliographic Guide to Black Studies by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York; and recommended for Native American collections by the Miami-Dade Public Library System in Florida. Nash uses her book to write articles and blogs on race relations in America through topics relating to her life--from music, film, early radio and television, entertainment, social media, Internet technology, publishing, journalism, sports, education, employment, the military, fashion, performing arts, literature, women's issues, adolescence and childhood, equal rights, social and political movements--past and present—to today's post-racism.




© 2014 Sunny Nash
All Rights Reserved Worldwide.
www.sunnynash.com

~Thank You~


Make Money Using Words